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Book Details


Multicoloured Glass Studies On Indian Short Stories


Subtitle: Foreword by Pinaki Roy


Authored By: Saikat Guha


Publisher:  Authorspress


ISBN-13: 9789352075829


Year of Publication: 2017


Pages: 342

                                       Binding: Hardback(HB)


Category:  English Literature


Price in Rs. 910.00

                             Price in (USA) $. 72.8

                            
Inclusive of All Taxes (After 30% Discount on the Printed Price)

Book Description


Book Contents


 

The Indian short story is not merely a derivative of the Western genre, but owes much to the great story-telling tradition of Indian antiquity. The mythical and legendary tales as well as folktales have provided a fertile soil for the modern Indian short story to germinate. Beginning towards the end of the nineteenth century, the Indian short story flourished in the twentieth century. It became evident by the end of the past century that the canon is attuned to Indian landscape whose heterogeneous people and their diverse experiences it reflects so faithfully. The Indian short story as a distinct genre resembles a “multicoloured glass” scattering myriad hues which is analogous to the diversity of our country itself. The variegated and unbeaten genre righteously deserves critical attention which it has been deprived of.

 

With twenty-seven scholarly articles by academics, professors and researchers, the present critical volume is a tribute to an affluent but neglected genre of Indian literature. In accord with the genre itself, the scope of the book allows for such diversity as the classic writers like Tagore and Manto; the feminist writers like Ismat Chughtai, Kamala Das, Shashi Deshpande and Indira Goswami; the dalit writers like Bama and Ajay Navaria; the diaspora writers like Bharati Mukherjee and Jhumpa Lahiri. The reworking of myth by Mahasweta Devi, the nature lore of Ruskin Bond, the saga of exile by the Kashmiri Pandits, the satire of Hari Shankar Parsai, the macabre tales of Satyajit Ray, the problematics of identity in Manoj Das and memory in TemsulaAo—all are taken into consideration within the structure of a single volume to make this a stimulating overview for students and scholars of Indian literature.

 

About the Book


 

The Indian short story is not merely a derivative of the Western genre, but owes much to the great story-telling tradition of Indian antiquity. The mythical and legendary tales as well as folktales have provided a fertile soil for the modern Indian short story to germinate. Beginning towards the end of the nineteenth century, the Indian short story flourished in the twentieth century. It became evident by the end of the past century that the canon is attuned to Indian landscape whose heterogeneous people and their diverse experiences it reflects so faithfully. The Indian short story as a distinct genre resembles a “multicoloured glass” scattering myriad hues which is analogous to the diversity of our country itself. The variegated and unbeaten genre righteously deserves critical attention which it has been deprived of. With twenty-seven scholarly articles by academics, professors and researchers, the present critical volume is a tribute to an affluent but neglected genre of Indian literature.


About the Author


 

Saikat Guha is pursuing his doctoral research at the Department of English, Cooch Behar PanchananBarma University, West Bengal. He obtained his MPhil from the Department of English, University of North Bengal and PG Diploma in Folklore and Culture Studies from IGNOU (Siliguri Regional Centre). He has been a guest lecturer of English at Falakata College (University of North Bengal). His diverse areas of interest include poetry, short story, Indian literature, postcolonialism, feminism, cultural studies, continental philosophy, folklore, and Northeast India. His articles appeared in various prestigious journals including Muse India,Rupkatha, The Apollonian, Singularities, Rock-Pebbles, Polyphony, Dialogue, New Fiction Journal, Heteroglossia, Appropriations, Glocal Colloquies, Tetso Interdisciplinary Journal, and in more than fifteen edited volumes. He co-edited (with Subashish Bhattacharjee and Mandika Sinha) two academic books—Reading Literature through Feminist Lens and Postcolonial Approaches to Literature, both published by AuthorsPress (New Delhi) in 2015.